ONEderland Detour: Office Parties & Meetings

The office can be that place where you bob and weave diet detours throughout your entire journey.  I recently started a new job and was delighted to find out that they “don’t really do birthdays….it’s not in our company culture.”  Well I think the culture is changing.  Even though they don’t do birthdays, that doesn’t seem to apply to my department AND they replaced birthdays with meetings with catered lunches instead.

The appeal of this new job was that I could keep myself on a much more regimented schedule with eating and snacks.  While that’s been true, what I didn’t expect was an increase in other “detours” like catered meetings.  Also this is holiday season so I expect the treats around the office to increase exponentially any day now.  As they say, “It’s better to have and not need than to need and not have.”  Translation: MAKE A PLAN.  I’ve given myself a few guardrails when it comes to munching during meetings to attempt to keep on track.

DO

  • Eat small to moderate portions – the good news is if I eat in front of people I eat less
  • Opt for baked, broiled or grilled food
  • Load up on fruits, vegetables and salads (with dressing on the side)
  • Look for baked chips, pretzels, salsa, lite dips and hummus
  • Choose sandwiches prepared with whole grain breads or tortillas

DON’T

  • Eat large portions.  Be cognoscente of how much you’re loading up on your plate
  • Avoid fried foods or ones prepared in lots of oil, heavy dressings, cheese or mayonnaise
  • Pass on sodas, sweet teas juices and adding whole milk to coffee
  • Try to avoid the cookies and cakes

THE CATCH

Sometimes you just want the cookie, or a cupcake or the chicken salad sandwich.  If you eat it, acknowledge it, adjust and move on.  Don’t throw the day away because you succumbed at the office birthday party or department meeting.  It’s not worth it.

When you have to tackle office birthdays and catered meetings, what do you do to stay on track?

And the journey to ONEderland continues. . . .

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